cdb debugger,Debug Tutorial Part 1: Beginning Debugging Using CDB and NTSD

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Introduction

Debugging is one of the most valuable skill sets when it comes to software development and maintenance. This is a skill that is used at every stage of a product's life cycle. The developer first creating the project will obviously run into bugs. These bugs can be anywhere from logic bugs to syntax bugs and compiler errors. The quality assurance being conducted on the software may run into problems as more advanced scenarios are tested and the software interacts with other environments. Finally, after release of the product, it must be supported. The debugging does not end when the customer gets the software, bugs are generally escalated back to the company who will now again need to debug.

What is the goal of this tutorial?

This tutorial is merely an introduction to debugging. This would be considered "tutorial #1" and I will write more add-ons if the feedback is good. There are a lot of complex debugging techniques and issues that it's hard to know where to start. This tutorial attempts to start at the beginning and get you acquainted with debugging. I hope to expose novices and intermediate level programmers to the world of advanced debugging. "Advanced" debugging, basically without recompiling, without doing "message box or printf debugging".

Debuggers and Operating Systems

To download the latest debuggers from Microsoft, visit here.

CDB, NTSD and Windbg

This article will generally talk about Windows 2000 and higher Operating Systems. The three debuggers that we will talk about here are CDB, NTSD and WinDbg. Windows 2000 and higher systems generally have NTSD already installed on the system! This is a big bonus as you do not need to install any extra software for quick debugging.

So what's the difference? The documentation says "NTSD does not need a console window and CDB does". That is true. NTSD does not need a console window in order to run, while CDB does. However, I have found that there are a lot more differences. The first is that older NTSDs do not support PDB symbol files, they only support DBG! I also found that NTSD does not support the symbol server, while CDB does. Older NTSDs could not create a memory dump and I've also found other problems such as NTSD only supports up to 2 breakpoint commands. There is one advantage that NTSD has now that CDB does not. The ability to not have a console window.

The ability to not have a console window is vital when you are debugging a user-mode service or process before anyone has logged onto the system. If no one has logged onto the system, you cannot create a console window. There is a command line option, -d, which specifies for NTSD to communicate with the attached kernel debugger (CDB has the same option). This can be used on processes during startup to debug them through the kernel debugger. While you can debug a process using the kernel debugger already, this gives you the flexibility to debug the process using the user-mode debugger. This is outside the scope of this current introduction article, just digest the concept for now.

WinDbg and CDB are basically the same with some few exceptions. The first is that WinDbg is a GUI and CDB is a console application. WinDbg also supports kernel debugging and source level debugging.

Visual C++ Debugger

I do not use this debugger and I would not recommend using it. The reasons are that this debugger is firstly a resource hog. It's slow loading and contains more than just debugging tools which makes it cumbersome. The second reason is generally, you need to reboot after you install this debugger. I generally work off the principal that the machine running or testing the software may not already have a debugger installed. VC++ is also a large, time consuming installation.

Windows 9x/ME

What can we do on Windows 9x/ME? Well, you can actually use WinDbg. The debug APIs are the same for all systems, so it has been long known to me that WinDbg should just "work" on Windows 9x/ME. My only concerns were if WinDbg attempted to detect it was on Windows 9x and not allow debugging. I recently found this to be untrue. The only problem is that the latest WinDbg installs are MSI packages that do not natively install on Windows 9x. This can be solved simply by installing them on an NT based machine and sharing the directory or even putting it on a CD. This obviously has other side effects though, such as do not think you can use all the !xxx commands as NT and 9x place their data in different memory locations. Do symbols work? Yes, PDBs work. I did find stepping through code after setting a ba r1 xxxxx was very slow though. This article does not cover Windows 9x/ME.

Setting Up Your Environment

This is a very important step before you start debugging or successfully set up your debug environment. The system needs to be configured to your liking and contain all the tools you need.

Symbols and the Symbol Server

Symbols are an important part of any debug operation. Microsoft contains a location where you can download all the symbols for any particular Operating System (Windows XP, etc.). The problem is, you need to have a lot of hard disk space and if you debug many Operating Systems on one machine (from crash dumps, etc.), then this is cumbersome.

To accommodate this need to debug many Operating Systems, Microsoft supports a "symbol server". This will help you to get the correct symbols onto your system. The symbol server is located here. If you set your symbol path to this location, your debugger will automatically download the system symbols that you need. The symbols that you need for your application are up to you.

Image File Execution Options

There is a location in the registry that will automatically attach a debugger to an application when it starts to run. This registry location is the following:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/SOFTWARE/Microsoft/Windows NT/CurrentVersion/Image File Execution Options

Under this registry key, you simply create a new registry key with the name of the process you want to debug, such as "myapplication.exe". If you have not used this before, there is probably a default key already created called "Your Application Here" or something similar. You can rename that key and use it if you like.

One of the values on this key is "Debugger". This should point to the debugger you want to start when this application is run. The default for "Your Application Here" is "ntsd -d". You cannot use this unless you have a kernel debugger attached so I would remove the "-d" part.

Note: Keeping "-d" and not having a kernel debugger attached could result in locking up of your system every time that application is run! Be careful. If you have a kernel debugger setup, you can unlock the system by hitting "g".

There is another value that may be there called "GlobalFlags". This is another tool that can be used for debugging, however it is outside the scope of this article. For more information on that, look up "gflags.exe".

Kernel Debugging Equipment

In order to kernel debug, you first need to boot the Operating System in debug mode. Although there is a GUI under system properties to do this, I generally edit the boot.ini directly. Locate the boot.ini on the root of your C:/ drive. It is most likely a hidden system file. I would attrib -r -s -h boot.ini and then open it for edit.

Caution: Editing this file incorrectly can prevent you from ever booting again!

The boot file may look like this:

[boot loader]timeout=30default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)/WINDOWS[operating systems]multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)/WINDOWS.0="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect

I would duplicate the first line under "Operating Systems":

[boot loader]timeout=30default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)/WINDOWS[operating systems]multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)/WINDOWS.0="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetectmulti(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)/WINDOWS.0= "Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect /debug /debugport=COM1 /baudrate=115200

The duplicated line can then contain your setup. /debug, then /debugport=port and finally /baudrate=baudrate. The debug port to use is the port of that machine where you would hook up your SERIAL NULL MODEM CABLE. This is a piece of hardware that you need. You will also need another machine. Aside from using the COM ports, you can use firewire which is a lot faster.

Next time you boot, just select the "Debugger Enabled" selection in order to boot in debug mode.

Environment Variables

I would generally setup _NT_SYMBOL_PATH to point to the Microsoft Symbol server and the local directory that contains your symbol information. To set this environment path, go to System Properties -> Advanced -> Environment Variables.

Default Debugger

This is the default debugger that will be used when any crash happens on the system. By default, it's generally set to "Doctor Watson". That program is not worth mentioning here. The registry key is this location:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/SOFTWARE/Microsoft/Windows NT/CurrentVersion/AeDebug

I would set "Auto" to 1 and "Debugger" to your debugger.

Assembly

I highly recommend that you learn assembly programming. These tutorials will not show source level debugging as I never do it and I don't even know how! The problems with source level debugging is that the source is not always available as well as sometimes the problem is not seen when just looking at the source, but rather in the generated code. It also makes walking the system much easier. If you understand how the environment was setup, you can easily reverse the system to finding out the information you need to know and it may not always be available using Source Level debugging.

The other thing I hate about source level debugging is that if the source does not match the symbols, the source debugger will not show you the correct information. This means that if you create multiple builds of your program or change your program after you've built, you better be able to find the source that matches the build you're debugging!

Let's Get Started

This tutorial is basically Part One and if it's liked, I will write more, each getting more and more advanced. This first tutorial will walk through a couple of simple scenarios of user-mode programming problems.

Symbols For Release Executables

First, how do you create symbols for "release" binaries? That's simple. You create a make file that properly rebases the binaries.

The options I generally would use for cl.exe would be:

/nologo /MD /W3 /Oxs /Zi /I "../../inc" /D "WIN32" /D "_WINDOWS" /Fr$(OBJDIR)// /Fo$(OBJDIR)// /Fd$(OBJDIR)// /c

The options I generally would use for link.exe would be:

/nologo /subsystem:console /out:$(TARGETDIR)/$(TARGET)/pdb:.pdb /debug /debugtype:both /LIBPATH:"../../../bin/lib"

This will create the .PDB for your project. Of course, with the introduction of VC++ 7, they have gotten rid of .DBGs (so /debugtype:both may error on this compiler). .DBG is a smaller version of the .PDB and it does not contain source information, strictly symbol look ups. It does not even contain the parameters or anything. If you're using a compiler that can still generate them, here's what you do:

rebase -b 0x00100000 -x $(TARGETDIR) -a $(TARGETDIR)/$(TARGET)

The -b is the new memory location to rebase the executable to. However, this will strip the debug symbols from the release executable making it smaller in size. If you build an executable the default Visual Studio method, it may be a tiny bit smaller than this executable. However, you do not have symbols. The generated code is the same and just as optimized using the optimization flags you specify. The difference is that these binaries are now more useful, as no matter where they go or who uses them where, you can still get symbols!

Remember, the best debugging always occurs if you do not have to rebuild the executable. Once you have to rebuild the executable, you must also know that you've now changed the memory foot print of the executable. You may also have changed the speed of the executable. This is critical since you now have to reproduce the problem using this binary! What if it took 4 days to cause this problem? It would be best to be able to debug it as much as possible on the spot.

Simple Access Violation Trap

Let's walk through a simple problem. Your program crashes with "Access Violation", this is not uncommon! This is probably the most frequent problem that occurs when running an executable. There are three steps to help solving this problem.

Who is attempting to do the access? What module? What is it attempting to access? Where did the memory come from? Why is it attempting to access it? What does it want to do with it?

These are general guidelines to solving this problem. I put #2 in italics as it is probably the most important of the three. However, solving 1 and 3 can also help determine #2 if it is not immediately apparent.

I have created a very simple program that crashes. I have setup my default debugger to be CDB and I have now just run the program. I have also created symbols for this executable as well as set the _NT_SYMBOL_PATH to the Microsoft symbol server.

As we can see, this is what happens when we run the program:

C:/programs/DirectX/Games/src/Games/temp/bin>tempMicrosoft (R) Windows DebuggerVersion 6.3.0005.1Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.*** wait with pending attachSymbol search path is: SRV*c:/symbols*http://msdl.microsoft.com/download/symbolsExecutable search path is:ModLoad: 00400000 00404000 C:/programs/DirectX/Games/src/Games/temp/bin/temp.exeModLoad: 77f50000 77ff7000 C:/WINDOWS.0/System32/ntdll.dllModLoad: 77e60000 77f46000 C:/WINDOWS.0/system32/kernel32.dllModLoad: 77c10000 77c63000 C:/WINDOWS.0/system32/MSVCRT.dllModLoad: 77dd0000 77e5d000 C:/WINDOWS.0/system32/ADVAPI32.DLLModLoad: 78000000 78086000 C:/WINDOWS.0/system32/RPCRT4.dll(ee8.c38): Access violation - code c0000005 (!!! second chance !!!)eax=00000000 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00001000 edx=00320608 esi=77c5aca0 edi=77f944a8eip=77c3f10b esp=0012fb0c ebp=0012fd60 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246MSVCRT!_output+0x18:77c3f10b 8a18 mov bl,[eax]ds:0023:00000000=??0:000>

What is the first thing we notice? This trap occurred in MSVCRT.DLL. This is apparent because the debugger generally displays this information using !+offset. This means the closest symbol in MSVCRT.DLL is _output and we are +18h bytes into it. Given that this is such a small offset and providing that the symbols are correct (even symbols can be incorrect, but that's a later tutorial), we can assume that we are in _output() function of MSVCRT.

(ee8.c38): Access violation - code c0000005 (!!! second chance !!!)eax=00000000 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00001000 edx=00320608 esi=77c5aca0 edi=77f944a8eip=77c3f10b esp=0012fb0c ebp=0012fd60 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246MSVCRT!_output+0x18:77c3f10b 8a18 mov bl,[eax]ds:0023:00000000=??0:000>

If we wanted to prove this, what could we do?

x *!startendmodule name00400000 00404000 temp (deferred)77c10000 77c63000 MSVCRT (pdb symbols) c:/symbols/msvcrt.pdb/3D6DD5921/msvcrt.pdb77dd0000 77e5d000 ADVAPI32 (deferred)77e60000 77f46000 kernel32 (deferred)77f50000 77ff7000 ntdll(deferred)78000000 78086000 RPCRT4 (deferred)

This command will give us a list of all the modules in the process with their beginning and ending memory locations. Our trap is at 77c3f10b, which is 77c10000 ; uMSVCRT!_output+0x17:77c3f10a 53 pushebx77c3f10b 8a18 mov bl,[eax]

I have highlighted all the important instructions to look at. Even if you do not know assembly, you will want to hear this out for what it is. First, we notice that the memory is coming from EAX. It's a register in the CPU, but we can just consider it a variable. The []s around EAX is the same as doing *MyPointer in C. This means we are referencing the memory pointed to by EAX. Where did EAX come from? EAX came from [EBP + 0Ch], which you could think of as "DWORD *EBP EAX = EBP[3];". This is because in assembly, there are no types. EAX is a 32 bit (DWORD) register. Dereferencing the DWORD at EBP + 12 is the same in C as adding 3 to a DWORD pointer (or 12 to a byte pointer then typecasting to a DWORD).

The next thing to look at is MOV EBP, ESP. ESP is the STACK POINTER. As you should know, parameters (pending calling convention and optimizations) are pushed on the stack, return addresses are pushed on the stack and local variables are on the stack. ESP points to the stack! In memory, a function call would look like this for the C calling convention:

[Parameter n]...[Parameter 2][Parameter 1][Return Address]

Now, we see PUSH EBP. PUSH means put something on the stack. So, we are saving EBP's previous value on the stack. So, our stack looks like this now:

[Parameter n]...[Parameter 2][Parameter 1][Return Address][Previous EBP]

Now that we have set EBP to ESP, we can treat it just like a pointer and the stack is just an array of DWORD values! So, here's the offsets of EBP and where they point:

[Parameter n] ==[EBP + n*4 + 4] (The formula)...[Parameter 2] ==[EBP + 12][Parameter 1] ==[EBP + 8][Return Address]==[EBP + 4][Previous EBP]==[EBP + 0]

This being the case, we know that our variable came from the second parameter of _output. So, now what? Let's un-assemble the calling function! We know that EBP + 4 points to the return address, or we could try to just get a stack trace.

0:000> kbChildEBP RetAddrArgs to Child0012fd60 77c3e68d 77c5aca0 00000000 0012fdb0 MSVCRT!_output+0x180012fda4 0040102f 00000000 00000000 00403010 MSVCRT!printf+0x350012ff4c 00401125 00000001 00323d70 00322ca8 temp!main+0x2f0012ffc0 77e814c7 77f944a8 00000007 7ffdf000 temp!mainCRTStartup+0xe30012fff0 00000000 00401042 00000000 78746341 kernel32!BaseProcessStart+0x230:000>

"KB" is one of the commands to do this. Now, we may not always get a full stack trace, however, this too is for a more advanced tutorial. In this simple tutorial, we will assume we got the full stack trace. We notice, this is a printf function call or it looks that way. As we notice, printf called _output. Let's un-assemble printf. Please note that we may not always want to disassemble the entire function and we may use discession. Sometimes, we can find out the trap just from doing a stack trace (I will go over this in this simple context at the end). These are small functions though and we may be able to trace them simply.

0:000>; u MSVCRT!_outputMSVCRT!_output:77c3f0f3 55 pushebp77c3f0f4 8bec mov ebp,esp77c3f0f6 81ec50020000 sub esp,0x25077c3f0fc 33c0 xor eax,eax77c3f0fe 8945d8 mov [ebp-0x28],eax77c3f101 8945f0 mov [ebp-0x10],eax77c3f104 8945ec mov [ebp-0x14],eax77c3f107 8b450c mov eax,[ebp+0xc]0:000>; uMSVCRT!_output+0x17:77c3f10a 53 pushebx77c3f10b 8a18 mov bl,[eax]77c3f10d 33c9 xor ecx,ecx77c3f10f 84db testbl,bl77c3f111 0f8445070000 jeMSVCRT!_output+0x769 (77c377c3f117 56 pushesi77c3f118 57 pushedi77c3f119 8bf8 mov edi,eax0:000>; u MSVCRT!printfMSVCRT!printf:77c3e658 6a10 push0x1077c3e65a 68e046c177 push0x77c146e077c3e65f e8606effff callMSVCRT!_SEH_prolog (77c35477c3e664 bea0acc577 mov esi,0x77c5aca077c3e669 56 pushesi77c3e66a 6a01 push0x177c3e66c e8bdadffff callMSVCRT!_lock_file2 (77c39477c3e671 59 pop ecx0:000>; uMSVCRT!printf+0x1a:77c3e672 59 pop ecx77c3e673 8365fc00 and dword ptr [ebp-0x4],0x077c3e677 56 pushesi77c3e678 e8c7140000 callMSVCRT!_stbuf (77c3fb44)77c3e67d 8945e4 mov [ebp-0x1c],eax77c3e680 8d450c lea eax,[ebp+0xc]77c3e683 50 pusheax77c3e684 ff7508 pushdword ptr [ebp+0x8]0:000>; uMSVCRT!printf+0x2f:77c3e687 56 pushesi77c3e688 e8660a0000 callMSVCRT!_output (77c3f0f3)

This is simple. We notice that the second parameter to _output is [EBP + 8]. We now notice that PUSH EBP and MOV EBP, ESP are there and thus the stack is setup the same way I mentioned previously. This is *not always* the case, but we are starting out slowly here.

Thus, we can determine that the first parameter to printf() is where the memory came from. And, as luck would have it, printf() was called from our program! From the trap information, we know that EAX was 0, so we were trying to dereference a NULL pointer.

77c3f10b 8a18mov bl,[eax] ds:0023:00000000=??

This was the code used:

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {char *TheLastParameter[100];sprintf(*TheLastParameter, "The last parameter is %s", argv[argc]);printf(*TheLastParameter);return 0; }

You can notice a lot of problems with it! However, the printf is what trapped since it was NULL. *TheLastParameter is NULL. Surprisingly it didn't trap on sprintf(). So, how would we have solved this just with KB? Look at this trace:

0:000> kbChildEBP RetAddrArgs to Child0012fd60 77c3e68d 77c5aca0 00000000 0012fdb0 MSVCRT!_output+0x180012fda4 0040102f 00000000 00000000 00403010 MSVCRT!printf+0x350012ff4c 00401125 00000001 00323d70 00322ca8 temp!main+0x2f0012ffc0 77e814c7 77f944a8 00000007 7ffdf000 temp!mainCRTStartup+0xe30012fff0 00000000 00401042 00000000 78746341 kernel32!BaseProcessStart+0x230:000>

We had symbols and we had the stack trace. The italics is the first parameter. It's 0. We also know that we called it. This is a very simple scenario though and I tried to portray some of the techniques that could be used to back trace to the location of a problem. Learn the stack. Knowing how the stack is setup and what memory is on the stack can be vital to finding and tracing where data came from. You will not always be that lucky to find where all information can be found with just doing "kb".

Program Not Working As Expected

This is a popular error. You run the program and you don't see the correct output or the program keeps giving you an error message. The file you want to create is not being created, etc. This is a very common problem that can be easy to complex to solve. What are some of the first steps you would take to debug this?

What is not working? What APIs or modules would this revolve around? What would cause those APIs to not function properly?

These are some steps, though they are not general. Let's say you have a program that attempts to create a file in Windows. The file is not created though. Let's look at some code:

HANDLE hFile;DWORD dwWritten;hFile = CreateFile("c:/MyFile.txt", GENERIC_READ, 0, NULL, OPEN_EXISTING, 0, NULL);if(hFile != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE){ WriteFile(hFile, "Test", strlen("Test"), &dwWritten, NULL); CloseHandle(hFile);}

This is your code. Generally, you would want to recompile with perhaps GetLastError() and print it out. However, you do not have to do that. Although in this case it may be simple to, if you're stepping through code and a function fails, wouldn't you want to know what happened on the spot? Let's try to debug this. First, we'll start the debugger and break on our function. Since we have symbols, this is easy. If we didn't, we could just break on CreateFile as it is an exported symbol and would always be available.

C:/programs/DirectX/Games/src/Games/temp/bin>cdb tempMicrosoft (R) Windows DebuggerVersion 6.3.0005.1Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.CommandLine: tempSymbol search path is: SRV*c:/symbols*http://msdl.microsoft.com/download/symbolsExecutable search path is:ModLoad: 00400000 00404000 temp.exeModLoad: 77f50000 77ff7000 ntdll.dllModLoad: 77e60000 77f46000 C:/WINDOWS.0/system32/kernel32.dllModLoad: 77c10000 77c63000 C:/WINDOWS.0/system32/MSVCRT.dll(2a0.94): Break instruction exception - code 80000003 (first chance)eax=00241eb4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00000004 edx=77f51310 esi=00241eb4 edi=00241f48eip=77f75a58 esp=0012fb38 ebp=0012fc2c iopl=0 nv up ei pl nz na pe nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=003bgs=0000 efl=00000202ntdll!DbgBreakPoint:77f75a58 cc int 30:000> bp temp!main0:000> g

We set a break point on our main() function and hit "go". We get the break point and we use "p" to step instruction by instruction to our CreateFile function.

Breakpoint 0 hiteax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401000 esp=0012ff50 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main:00401000 51 pushecx0:000>; peax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401001 esp=0012ff4c ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x1:00401001 56 pushesi0:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401002 esp=0012ff48 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x2:00401002 57 pushedi0:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401003 esp=0012ff44 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x3:00401003 33ff xor edi,edi0:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401005 esp=0012ff44 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x5:00401005 57 pushedi0:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401006 esp=0012ff40 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x6:00401006 57 pushedi0:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401007 esp=0012ff3c ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x7:00401007 6a03 push0x30:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401009 esp=0012ff38 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x9:00401009 57 pushedi0:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=0040100a esp=0012ff34 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0xa:0040100a 57 pushedi0:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=0040100b esp=0012ff30 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0xb:0040100b 6800000080 push0x800000000:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401010 esp=0012ff2c ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x10:00401010 6810304000 push0x4030100:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401015 esp=0012ff28 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x15:00401015 ff1504204000 call dword ptr [temp!_imp__CreateFileA (00402004)]{kernel32!CreateFileA (77e7b476)} ds:0023:00402004=77e7b4760:000>; peax=ffffffff ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=77f939e3 edx=00000002 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=0040101b esp=0012ff44 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei ng nz na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000286temp!main+0x1b:0040101b 8bf0 mov esi,eax

After we call CreateFile, EAX will have the return value. We notice it's ffffffff or "Invalid Handle Value". We want to know the GetLastError. This is stored at fs:34. FS is the TEB selector, so we can dump it.

0:000> dd fs:340038:0000003400000002 00000000 00000000 000000000038:0000004400000000 00000000 00000000 000000000038:0000005400000000 00000000 00000000 000000000038:0000006400000000 00000000 00000000 000000000038:0000007400000000 00000000 00000000 000000000038:0000008400000000 00000000 00000000 000000000038:0000009400000000 00000000 00000000 000000000038:000000a400000000 00000000 00000000 00000000

CDB also has a quicker way to do it, !gle:

0:000> !gleLastErrorValue: (Win32) 0x2 (2) - The system cannot find the file specified.LastStatusValue: (NTSTATUS) 0xc0000034 - Object Name not found.0:000>

So, the file cannot be found. But, the file is there! So what's the problem? We need to debug this further. One thing we could look at is what parameter was passed into CreateFile.

eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401010 esp=0012ff2c ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x10:00401010 6810304000 push0x4030100:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401015 esp=0012ff28 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x15:00401015 ff1504204000 call dword ptr [temp!_imp__CreateFileA (00402004)]{kernel32!CreateFileA (77e7b476)} ds:0023:00402004=77e7b476

Luckily, it's a constant so the memory will still be around. It would still be around even if it wasn't though since we didn't step too far away from the return of CreateFile.

We can then use "da", "dc" or "du". "da" is dump ANSI string, "du" is dump Unicode string and "dc" is similar to "dd" except it dumps all characters, even unprintable ones. Since we know it's an ANSI string, just use da.

0:000> da 40301000403010"c:MyFile.txt"0:000>

That's wrong! We need to use C://MyFile.txt to get it to work with the C:/!

So, we fix this. But wait, it still won't write! We need to debug this further.

We do the same thing again.

C:/programs/DirectX/Games/src/Games/temp/bin>;cdb tempMicrosoft (R) Windows DebuggerVersion 6.3.0005.1Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.CommandLine: tempSymbol search path is: SRV*c:/symbols*http://msdl.microsoft.com/download/symbolsExecutable search path is:ModLoad: 00400000 00404000 temp.exeModLoad: 77f50000 77ff7000 ntdll.dllModLoad: 77e60000 77f46000 C:/WINDOWS.0/system32/kernel32.dllModLoad: 77c10000 77c63000 C:/WINDOWS.0/system32/MSVCRT.dll(80c.c94): Break instruction exception - code 80000003 (first chance)eax=00241eb4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00000004 edx=77f51310 esi=00241eb4 edi=00241f48eip=77f75a58 esp=0012fb38 ebp=0012fc2c iopl=0 nv up ei pl nz na pe nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=003bgs=0000 efl=00000202ntdll!DbgBreakPoint:77f75a58 cc int 30:000>; bp temp!main0:000>; gBreakpoint 0 hiteax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401000 esp=0012ff50 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main:00401000 51 pushecx0:000>; peax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401001 esp=0012ff4c ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x1:00401001 56 pushesi0:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401002 esp=0012ff48 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x2:00401002 57 pushedi0:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401003 esp=0012ff44 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x3:00401003 33ff xor edi,edi0:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401005 esp=0012ff44 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x5:00401005 57 pushedi0:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401006 esp=0012ff40 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x6:00401006 57 pushedi0:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401007 esp=0012ff3c ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x7:00401007 6a03 push0x30:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401009 esp=0012ff38 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x9:00401009 57 pushedi0:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=0040100a esp=0012ff34 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0xa:0040100a 57 pushedi0:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=0040100b esp=0012ff30 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0xb:0040100b 6800000080 push0x800000000:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401010 esp=0012ff2c ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x10:00401010 6810304000 push0x4030100:000>;eax=77c5c9e4 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=00322cf8 edx=00322cf8 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=00401015 esp=0012ff28 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x15:00401015 ff1504204000 call dword ptr [temp!_imp__CreateFileA (00402004)]{kernel32!CreateFileA (77e7b476)} ds:0023:00402004=77e7b4760:000>;eax=000007e8 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=77f59037 edx=00140608 esi=00000000 edi=00000000eip=0040101b esp=0012ff44 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei ng nz ac pe cycs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000293temp!main+0x1b:0040101b 8bf0 mov esi,eax0:000>; p

We get here and we notice that EAX is a valid handle and not invalid handle value! Let's continue.

eax=000007e8 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=77f59037 edx=00140608 esi=000007e8 edi=00000000eip=0040101d esp=0012ff44 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei ng nz ac pe cycs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000293temp!main+0x1d:0040101d 83feff cmp esi,0xffffffff0:000>;eax=000007e8 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=77f59037 edx=00140608 esi=000007e8 edi=00000000eip=00401020 esp=0012ff44 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl nz ac pe cycs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000213temp!main+0x20:00401020 741b jztemp!main+0x3d (0040103d)[br=0]0:000>;eax=000007e8 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=77f59037 edx=00140608 esi=000007e8 edi=00000000eip=00401022 esp=0012ff44 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl nz ac pe cycs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000213temp!main+0x22:00401022 8d442408 lea eax,[esp+0x8] ss:0023:0012ff4c=00322cf80:000>;eax=0012ff4c ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=77f59037 edx=00140608 esi=000007e8 edi=00000000eip=00401026 esp=0012ff44 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl nz ac pe cycs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000213temp!main+0x26:00401026 57 pushedi0:000>;eax=0012ff4c ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=77f59037 edx=00140608 esi=000007e8 edi=00000000eip=00401027 esp=0012ff40 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl nz ac pe cycs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000213temp!main+0x27:00401027 50 pusheax0:000>;eax=0012ff4c ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=77f59037 edx=00140608 esi=000007e8 edi=00000000eip=00401028 esp=0012ff3c ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl nz ac pe cycs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000213temp!main+0x28:00401028 6a04 push0x40:000>;eax=0012ff4c ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=77f59037 edx=00140608 esi=000007e8 edi=00000000eip=0040102a esp=0012ff38 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl nz ac pe cycs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000213temp!main+0x2a:0040102a 6820304000 push0x4030200:000>;eax=0012ff4c ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=77f59037 edx=00140608 esi=000007e8 edi=00000000eip=0040102f esp=0012ff34 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl nz ac pe cycs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000213temp!main+0x2f:0040102f 56 pushesi0:000>;eax=0012ff4c ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=77f59037 edx=00140608 esi=000007e8 edi=00000000eip=00401030 esp=0012ff30 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl nz ac pe cycs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000213temp!main+0x30:00401030 ff1500204000 call dword ptr [temp!_imp__WriteFile (00402000)]{kernel32!WriteFile (77e7f13a)} ds:0023:00402000=77e7f13a0:000>; peax=00000000 ebx=7ffdf000 ecx=77e7f1c9 edx=00000015 esi=000007e8 edi=00000000eip=00401036 esp=0012ff44 ebp=0012ffc0 iopl=0 nv up ei pl zr na po nccs=001bss=0023ds=0023es=0023fs=0038gs=0000 efl=00000246temp!main+0x36:00401036 56 pushesi

We've just called WriteFile and EAX == 0. That means false! Let's check the other variables.

The second parameter is right and its length is 4:

0:000> da 40302000403020"Test"

The fourth parameter in bold back there, it's a pointer to the number of bytes written. It's 0.

0:000> dd 012ff4c0012ff4c00000000 00401139 00000001 003224700012ff5c00322cf8 00403000 00403004 0012ffa40012ff6c0012ff94 0012ffa0 00000000 0012ff980012ff7c00403008 0040300c 00000000 000000000012ff8c7ffdf000 00000001 00322470 000000000012ff9c8053476f 00322cf8 00000001 0012ff840012fface1176590 0012ffe0 00401200 004020c00012ffbc00000000 0012fff0 77e814c7 00000000

Well, let's check GetLastError.

0:000> !gleLastErrorValue: (Win32) 0x5 (5) - Access is denied.LastStatusValue: (NTSTATUS) 0xc0000022 - {Access Denied}A process has requested access to an object, but has not been granted those access rights.0:000>

Access denied? What could cause that! Let's check, wait, we opened the file for READ access only! We didn't open the file for write access! So, we can easily fix this problem and move onto our next project!

hFile = CreateFile("c://MyFile.txt", GENERIC_READ, 0, NULL, OPEN_EXISTING, 0, NULL); Conclusion

In summary, this is just an introduction to some very basic debugging techniques. The examples were simple but you must take their value for the techniques they displayed. This is just the first installment of this debugging tutorial. Hopefully, if there is interest, I may add more tutorials getting more advanced.

To some, this tutorial may be simple, to others too advanced. You will not become a good debugger overnight, it takes practice. I would suggest attempting to use the debugger even on the simplest of problems, to solve them. The more you practice, the better you get. I guarantee, the more you fool around with the tools, the more you will learn.

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